Saving the Peregrine Falcon

Funding source: Communities for Nature 2012 Small Grants Round

Start/ Finish: 01/06/2013   31/5/2014

Project Overview: Since 1988 the number of active nests used by peregrine falcons on the Red Gum Plains around Bairnsdale has declined from 12 to one. South of the Great Dividing Range these birds use tree hollows for nesting but as these trees decline the GPCMN is erecting nestboxes.

 Outputs:

•Locate and install 10 new nesting sites around Rosedale/Maffra for Nesting Boxes

•Monitor Boxes ( ongoing)

•Increase public awareness of the plight of the Falcon.

Background:

Since 1988 the number of active nests used by peregrine falcons on the Red Gum Plains around Bairnsdale has declined from 12 to one.

Although normally a cliff-nesting species, peregrine falcons south of the Great Dividing Range use tree hollows (north of the divide only they will also use vacant wedge-tailed eagle stick nests). Natural attrition, clearing for agriculture and timber collection has reduced the numbers of suitable tree for this bird. The fastest bird in the world, the peregrine falcon

There appears to be a genetic element to the hollow-nesting habit. Germany lost its hollow-nesting peregrines to DDT (which caused eggshell thinning) in 1965 – attempts to reintroduce birds bred on cliff nests have failed.

With the support of our sponsors – the CMN is erecting artificial nestboxes for the falcons.

Nest Boxes

Nest Boxes

More info or pictures can go here